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About Paul Preiss

Paul Preiss is the CEO and Founder of the Iasa, one of the largest Enterprise and IT architect associations in the world. Through his time at Iasa, Paul has taken the association from a single user group in Austin Tx to an international organization with chapters in over 25 countries. Paul’s vision is a unified architecture profession with effective education, credentials and ethics which fully supports corporate strategy and delivery. He is a tireless advocate for the field and speaks on topics ranging form architecture ethics to best the best setup and structure for architecture teams. Paul has spoken at hundreds of events as well as held conferences and training for architects all over the world. He is an expert software and enterprise architect in practice and continues to work with companies on optimizing their technology strategy. Prior to developing Iasa, Paul was the chief architect for Dell Pan Asia where he helped to integrate the technology strategy across 14 countries. He also served as the chief architect for the Sears point of sale replacement in North America consisting of 2000 stores and thousands of suppliers as well as the chief architect for a digital asset management firm, Ancept.

Architecturally Significant Requirements

Download The ASR Card is a tool to define an architecturally significant requirement. Card AreaDefinition/UseLinks ToASR and ContextWrite the ASR in common requirements format for your target PM method. Significance and Impact Describe how the ASR is significant and what makes it so. OKRsCharacteristicsList relevant characteristics based on estimations from stakeholders.Strategy and PlanWhat decisions need

Architecture Assessment

Architecture assessments provide an essential tool to reduce risk, increase decision quality and ensure successful architecture delivery.

Competency

Competency is the knowledge, skills and ability of an architect to deliver value within the purpose of the profession.

Circuit Breaker

The Circuit Breaker pattern is used to check the availability of an external service, detect failures and prevent them from happening constantly.  For example, if an application needs to retrieve data from an external service 100 times per second, and the service is unavailable  (e.g., down for maintain ace or because of a hardware failure),

Retry Pattern

There are some consideration when using retry pattern: When there is an indication that the fault is not transient or unlikely for service request to be successful if repeated (for example, an authentication failure caused by invalid user credentials or bad request send to service , e.g., HTTP status code 4xx received from the service), the application should not try to retry , but abort the operation invocation and report a suitable exception. If the specific fault is unusual or rare, it may have been caused by extraordinary circumstances such as a network packet lost in transit. In this case, the application could immediately retry the same request again because the same failure is unlikely to happen again and the request will probably be successful. If the fault is caused by issues such as service being not fully responsive (e.g., “service busy “) the service consumer should wait for a suitable time before retrying the request.

Modern Patterns 1

The first installment of modern patterns with basic descriptions. A part of the collection of modern architecture patterns for the ITABoK.

Technical Debt

Technical debt is a critical issue for all architects and developers of software intensive systems. Learn techniques for dealing with it.

Lifecycles Overview

The architecture lifecycle, or Architecture Development Life Cycle (ADLC), are the stages that an architecture goes through from its inception to its decommissioning. The ADLC provides a guiding process for developing architecture, and helps the architect understand and communicate the state of the architecture.